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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 617 (some duplicates have been removed)
and then they pass a subset of that information to n.s.a., they call it a data stream. n.s.a. then takes that data stream and filters it again against specific criteria that it has, such as an e-mailaddrest protocol addresses. >> warner: so in that data
foreign powers. and the violations that are documented in this memorandum from the n.s.a.-- remember, we're only seeing a partial window-- we're seeing what the n.s.a. headquarters reported in a year's time, not what all the other n.s.a. satellite offices offered, but in those instances they broke some of the privacy rules, and they broke some other rules that have to do with foreign intelligence gathering. the most striking probably #-r example that people are taken by is that there were a series of
raw data, right? nsa having exactly what the phone companies have. and what's the test? what's the standard for the nsa being able to search or query that data? right now you have to have a reasonable suspicion that that phone number was involved in terrorist activity? nsa can get that unilaterally. you do not have to get advance notice from the fisa court. i propose before they do any kind of query, any kind of search, they have to go to the fisa court. and at that step in the process,
happening and so the probability that wholly domestic communications are being picked up by the n.s.a. is just the same as it has been at least since 2008. the way that n.s.a. handles those communications now is somewhat different. they are trying to basically segregate and quarantine the sets of communications that are likely to contain wholly domestic communications and handle them so that they don't get distributed throughout n.s.a. databases or into intelligence reports and make their way kind of throughout the
. collectively, those providers cover 75% of united states communications. the n.s.a. and the telephone companies have constructed sort of a two-step filtering system that means that the telecommunications companies do the first cut of filtering based on the guidelines that n.s.a. provide under the court order and then they pass a subset of that information to n.s.a., they
official today declassified documents showing that for three years, the national security agency, or n.s.a., collected more than 50,000 emails a year between americans with no connection to terrorism. the foreign intelligence surveillance court in 2011 ruled the collection methods unconstitutional. today's documents show changes the n.s.a made so the program-- designed to target foreign intelligence-- could continue.
of congress, including senator patrick leahy of vermont. >> i want to know if -- whether it's n.s.a. or anybody else that's made a mistake, we ought to know that. if they're tapping into people's telephones where they have no right to, we ought to know that. >> reporter: almost 20 billions are already pending in congress to limit the surveillance program, to protect american calls and e-mails, and to ins the n.s.a. reports to
that the court does provide a major check but on the other it's after the fact and the n.s.a. has a fair amount of leeway to construct its surveillance programs and there's a certain amount of self-policing that goes on there.>> warner: this program nw continues. did the fixes the n.s.a. made,
fisa court, ordered the agency to destroy. the n.s.a. argues that the number of privacy violations is tiny compared to the 20 million data searches done every month in the hunt for terrorists. n.s.a. compliance director john delong told reporters by phone: t mistakes are routinely disclosed to the fisa court, to the justice department and to congress. >> .
another hearing on the nsa surveillance program. house speaker nancy pelosi called the report, quote, extremely disturbing in a statement saying in part, congress must conduct rigorous oversight to ensure that all incidents, all incidents of noncompliance are reported to the oversight committees and the fisa court in a timely and comprehensive manner and that appropriate steps are taken to ensure violations are not repeated. the report stems from an nsa audit obtained by the post from leaker edward snowden.
>> another republican says senator paul is wrong. senator peter king from new york says the nsa has a high batting average when it comes to preventing terror attacks and protecting individual rights. >> the senator said billions of phone calls were collected but only is00 were reported by the nsa. he says no one's rights from
are more serious. >>> the federal surveillance corp. that has jurisdiction over the nsa ordered it to destroy after five years all the call data records that it gathers on innocent americans. it did not do that. there were several thousand files. >> reporter: the agency said in a state to nbc news, when nsa makes a mistake in carrying out
finally weighed in on these latest developments, defending the nsa. white house deputy spokesman josh ernest saying in a quote, "this administration is committed to ensuring that privacy protections are carefully adhered to and continually reviewing ways to effectively enhance privacy procedures." wolf, these latest revelations
the adversarial position. i think most people are concerned that nsa is willy-nilly getting content or doing searches. i do believe that we make sure that that can never have. >> even if they're not getting content or searches, they're getting a heck of a lot of information as everyone who knows what that phone data is, should someone choose to misuse it.
to greenwald, miranda spent nine hours answering questions only about edward snowden and the nsa, no terror-related questions. whatever the reason, brazilian diplomats are expressing their outrage and some british members of parliament are saying his detention was an abuse of the
audit that identified thousands of incidents in which the n.s.a. ran afoul of collections operations. the two democratic senators ron widen and mark yoo dal, both members of the intelligence committee said in a joint statement there are more dials come, "the executive branch has now confirmed the rules and regulations and court imposed standards for protecting the privacy of americans have been violated thousands of times eeach year" that's just the tip
're reporting partner on the nsa stories, laura, in berlin. >> yes. >> i read the guardian paid for david's flights. glen, was he carrying classified material with him? >> well, i'm not going to talk about what he was carrying because that's our work product as journalist, remember both laura and i are working with "the guardian." every single newsroom has
of it contains information that is responsive to what n.s.a. is looking for with its foreign intelligence filters, but they have to hand over the whole bundle of communications, which may also include wholly domestic communications.
made. the nsa says it has 300 employees whose job is to work on preventing the breaches and beef up compliance.
collection program, end quote. nsa officials said the agency's activities were lawful and any mistakes were largely
>> that's right. and sometimes the nsa folks come after the fact to the court and say hey, court, here's what we say happened. here's what we believe happened. just approve it retroactively. so here's what i'm saying. you need to get advanced approval for even a query. certainly you need to get probable cause for any kind of content information.
>> it's incliewr from the document because it's really an n.s.a. internal audit is how many of these were reported to the court. a portion them should have been that have to do with fisa authorities, when you're looking into americans' records and we honestly don't have the rest of the chain ton what was reported. what we coknow is there are thousands of them and the obama administration has assured us and the public before this came out that it happens infrequently, once in a while. >> warner: now, equally
, this is nearly 3,000 violations, over a one-year period. we should point out the nsa says, though, in a statement, quote, we're a human-run agency operating in a complex environment with a number of different regulatory regimes, so at times we find ourselves on the wrong side of the line. but we have been assured, up and down, both on background with officials and on television, that the proper oversight is in
of the intelligence committee. >> exactly, and a very strong ally for the government and n.s.a. in supporting these efforts. she said that she feels the subsector, subsection of violation thereas she doesn't have authority over, she should now perhaps gain authority to review some of those that have to do with foreign
nsa employee, uncovering government secrets, shooting and producing
>> working with top-level sources like that former nsa employee, uncovering government secrets, shooting and producing her films all over the world, laura poitras, the documentarian, she has been busy. she's been doing traveling for her work, for her films, she found she gets stopped a lot at the airport and not anything like what you might get stopped for at the airport for. she's been stopped dozens and dozens of times at the airport. for interrogations that sometimes last for hours. miss poitras started taking extraordinary precautions with her data using encrypted e-mail, working on computers that were not connected to the internet. stashing her notes in safe deposit boxes. she kept on, though, getting stopped at the airport. starting in 2006, she was detained and questioned like
. >> thank you. >> moving on to the nsa. it has been roughly 2.5 months since the edward snowden leaks were exposed to the world and the mass surveillance operations unveiled. to this day, the nsa still is not sure of the extent of these leaks. unnamed sources within the intelligence committee told nbc news that the nsa is overwhelmed trying to figure out what edward snowden took. keith alexander was asked in july about just how much the agency knows regarding the extent of the leaks. >> let me ask you about edward snowden. you cannot tell us what he got but do you feel now that you know what he got? >> yes. >> this latest report contradicts that claim. alexander answered the question in a more general sense, a spokesman said. more news is breaking about the scope of the nsa's surveillance of the internet, particularly u.s. networks. more unnamed government and in taligent's officials -- intelligence officials said the u.s. has the ability to monitor 75% of the domestic internet traffic here. it does this through a series of relationships with internet providers that at the request of the n
>> coming up, the u.s. government released documents showing a past secret court ruling on nsa surveillance. they chastise the nsa for illegally collecting tens of thousands of e-mails. the unmasking ahead. the army whistleblower manning sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking documents but the story does not end there. we will look at the extreme conditions placed on the media as we covered the trial. in san francisco, officials are considering a class-action lawsuit against nevada, laming it gave hundreds of psychiatric patients at one-way ticket to california. it is thursday, august 22. 5 p.m. in washington dc. while the obama administration is trying to beat its critics to the punch in the wake of the nsa surveillance scandal, they are coming clean, in a way, anyway. and the ruling that came out in 2011 after the electronic frontier foundation filed a request pretty recently. the court lambasted the nsa for illegally collecting as many as 56,000 e-mails from innocent people each year over three years. then the nsa proceeded to misrepresent the size and scope of that col
it was harsh. how about those people who lied to the congress that represents the people about the nsa activities and bold faced lies saying they did not spy on americans? that is all i have to say. what you think about the sentence to reprimanding and what others would do if they provide that type of information? those in the future might provide this type of information to the public as well? caller: i would like to echo the previous gentleman's comments, and that is they did take an oath. at what point does your --scious do the right thing it is really a tough question. he did break his oath. at the same time, at what point is there a point when you should break the oath when it is for the greater good? >> usa today reflects hemlines and other papers. nsa admits new privacy violations. kevin johnson writing about the top intelligence officials here yen . there are other accounts of the story as well. theheard some thoughts on 35-year sentence handed down. you could make your thoughts known as well. kentucky up next. archie on the independent line. good morning. personally i think th
about the nsa. "the washington post" just reporting the nsa has broken privacy rules or overstepped legal authority thousands of times each year since 2008. according to an internal audit, most of the violations are of americans or foreign intelligence officials in the united states. and the "washington post" also reporting that the chief judge of the secret court that's supposed to provide oversight of the government's spying program says the court's ability to do so is limited. john sununu joins us. good evening, sir. >> good evening. >> with the news breaking, certainly an expansion of what we have been hearing about the nsa in terms of swpying. your thoughts? >> two things. a lot of what happens in an agency, even the nsa, is a reflection of the culture they see from the top. you have a. president and administration that levels in going beyond the box f you will, that they are limited to by law. i think that seeped all the way down into the nsa. even though the audit says i think it's in the last year they point out there's nearly 3,000 violati violations, it does say that the b
, the nsa's own internal audit reveals the agency has broken its own privacy rules and overstepped its legal authority thousands of times a year. then we go to cairo where the muslim brotherhood has called for a day of rage after more than 600 people were killed on wednesday. >> the one thing people will not stand for in the long term is to have this kind of regressive security state inflicted upon them. once the targets of this authoritarian apparatus moves away from the islamists and starts imposing itself on other parts of egyptian society, then perhaps,e might see, once again a popular uprising against that kind of crackdown. >> we will speak with sharif abdel kouddous in cairo and p.j. crowley, former state department spokesperson, who is called for the u.s. to suspend military aid to egypt and call the ouster of mohamed morsi a coup. then, didn't eight-year-old spy for america? we look at how u.s. allies in yemen used a child the place electronic chips on the man he considered to be his surrogate father. days later, the man was killed in u.s. drone strike. all of that and more coming u
you next three. >> john: i'm john roberts in for chris wallace. new allegations rock the nsa. documents leaked why former nsa contractor edward snowden detail thousands of privacy violations by the agency after repeated denials from the white house. >> what you are not reading about is the government actually abusing these programs. >> john: we'll discuss with a key member of the homeland security committee and critic of the nsa kentucky senator rand paul. then, another week of chaos in egypt as the interim government's crackdown on supporters of ousted president mohammed morsi leaves hundreds of people dead. >> our traditional cooperation cannot continue as usual when civilians are being killed in the streets. thee'll discuss the deteriorating situation in the region and the u.s. response with republican congressman pete king of new york and democratic senator richard blumenthal of connecticut. plus, another delay for the president's healthcare law forces the obama administration to play defense. >> this is no longer a political debate. this is what we call the law. >> the p
nsa. >> documents leaked by former nsa contractor edward snowden detail thousands of privacy violations after repeated denials from the white house. >> what you are not reading rea about is the government gov actually abusing these programs. >> we'll discuss with a key member of the homeland security committee and critic of the nsa kentucky senator rand paul. >> and then another week of chaos in egypt as the interim government's crackdown on supporters of mohamed morsi leaves hundreds of people dead.. >> our pro decisional cooperation cannot continue as usual when civilians are being killed in the streets. >> we will discuss the deteriorating situation in the region and the u.s. response with republican congressman pete king from new york and richard bloom -- bloom nee -- bloomenthal. >> and forcing the obama administration to play defense. >> this is no longer aat w political debate. this is what we call the law. >> the president claims that this law is working the way it is supposed to. but clearly it is not. >> we will ask our sundayn: w panel about the political fallout a
. >> shepard: the nsa spying scandal. moments ago they declassified pages of a secret document. catherine herridge has the details. plus the suspected fort hood shooter began his defense. he barely said anything. does he really want our government to kill him so he can become a martyr? if he does, should it? [ male announcer ] want healthy joints?° ♪ the joint is jumpin' ♪ it's really jumpin' osteo bi-flex® helps strengthen your joints.° like calcium supplements can help your bones, osteo bi-flex® can help your joints° so you can keep doing what you love. ♪ osteo bi-flex... the best stuff in the joint.™ now in joint and muscle formula for people that demand evenore from their bodies. for people that demand anbe a name and not a number?tor scottrade. ron: i'm never alone with scottrade. i can always call or stop by my local office. they're nearby and ready to help. so when i have questions, i can talk to someone who knows exactly how i trade. because i don't trade like everybody. i trade like me. that's why i'm with scottrade. announcer: scottrade- proud to be ranked "best ove
's privacy rights didn't. nsa broke the privacy rules thousands of times per year. >> obama care is coming. the extra cost isn't the only thing to bring with it he what every american needs to hear. >> a discovery for dog owners every where. warnings of serious health risks. "fox & friends first" starts right now. >> good morning everyone. you are watching "fox & friends first" on this friday morning. i am patti ann browne. >> i am heather childers. thank you so much for starting your day with us. right to our top story. breaking news overnight the nsa broke privacy rules and over stepped the legal authority thousands of times each year. that's according to a new report from the "washington post". most violations involved the unauthorized surveillance of america. >> elizabeth brpran is liv prane from washington with the latest. >> the agency over stepped the boundaries. edward snowden proving significant violations include the unauthorized use of information on more than 3,000 americans and green card holders quote a large number of calls from washington were intercepted in 2008 after the
the ease with which the nsa by the push of a button, whether deliberate or accidental, can get large volumes of u.s. communications. >> reporter: "the washington post" reporter that broke the story says the internal nsa audit leaked to him by edward snowden contains more information than is provided to congressional oversite committees. dianne feinstein said in a written statement the committee quote, can and should do more to independently verify that nsa's operations are appropriate. but the aclu's michelle richardson asks how. >> members of congress have been clear, they have not received a full explanation how the programs worked or any clients' problems with privacy regulations. >> reporter: an nsa tutorial instructs analysts not to give extraneous information to congressional overseers. the president says there's no indication the agency is abusing its powers. >> what you're not reading about is the government actually abusing these programs. what you're hearing about is the prospect that these could be abused. >> reporter: the nsa is now drawing fire from the left and right, w
on the "newshour": bradley manning gets 35 years in jail; how the n.s.a. spies on internet activity and eleanor holmes norton looks back at the march on washington. but first, with the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: an egyptian court today ordered the release of ex-president hosni mubarak. a hearing was held at tora prison, where the ailing 85-year-old has been detained for two years. once freed, he'll be placed under house arrest on orders of egypt's prime minister. mubarak also faces charges of failing to prevent the deaths of protesters in the 2011 uprising that ousted him from power. meanwhile the european union held emergency talks on the egyptian crisis in brussels. its foreign policy chief, catherine ashton, said the e.u. member nations strongly condemn the recent spate of violence between the interim government and supporters of the muslim brotherhood. >> we've agreed, as well, to review the issue of our assistance to egypt with the understanding of assistance to the most vulnerable groups and to civil society must continue. member states have agreed to suspend e
to the panel that will decide his guilt or innocence. a live report just ahead. >>> plus the nsa's secrets reviewed. new revelations that the agency gathered thousands of emails from innocent americans. >>> new reaction to the murder of a college act three involving three teenagers. what a top civil rights leader is now saying about it as the victim's girlfriend speaks out. >> he is chatty, he could talk to anybody about anything at anytime. it was amazing. i was always shier one that had everything to say. he could talk to a wall. he is such an amazing person and i'm going to miss him. [ male announcer ] staying warm and dry has never been our priority. ♪ catering to the conveniently lated has never been our priority. our priority is, was and always will be serving you, the american people. we get to see everyone in america almost every day. and we've noticed that you're sending and receiving more packages than ever. so we wanted to give you a more reliable way to ship them. with improved priority mail flat rate. don't just take our word for it -- now we'll prove it every step of the wa
or the cause? plus, we're blowing the roof off the biggest nsa scandal yet. now we're learning the agency broke privacy rules. thousands of times per year. folks, this is going to blow your mind. and then -- >> this happy, happy, happy -- [ applause ] >> eric: he should be happy. he just won the lotto. wait until you hear what a majority of americans say they would do if they won. this is going to shock you. "cashin' in" uncompromising, defenders of freedom and capitalism starts right now. ♪ ♪ >> eric: hi, everybody. i'm eric bolling. welcome to "cashin' in". wane rogers, jonathan hoenig, bob beckel and star parker. welcome, everybody. first, the big cities and now the suburb. poverty papeful reality for one in five americans and that includes moms, dads and kids. in 1964, president johnson declared a national war on poverty. over the decade since, taxpayers funded a massive redistribution of wealth. in the year since that declared war, welfare spending is up 11,000%. spending on food stamps ballooned. 32,000%. with trillions of tax dollars diverted to combat and post officeerty, one would
. >>> the story of egypt takes a dark turn, and the nsa story takes another turn. today -- >> we want egypt to succeed. we want a peaceful, democratic, prosperous egypt. that's our interest. >> american values and american interests. the u.s. may have to choose. we talk with senator john mccain just back from egypt. >>> then, mistakes were made. new revelations about privacy violations at the national security agency. who is watching the watchers? congressman chris van hollen and justin amash join us. and -- >> we want them to look back and say, this is when the rnc got it right. >> republicans reboot in boston and hillary sets up a speaking tour. hello, 2016. our powerhouse political panel sorts it out. then -- the new orleans saints, the oakland raiders and a first down for the girl from pascagoula. an update on sarah thomas. i'm crowley, and this is "state of the union." >>> after days of deadly violence across the country, egypt's interim government is asking the world to listen to its side of the story. members of the foreign ministry released video today of the recent chaos and blamed
detail wrong. the detail having to do with race. >>> and later, is is all this coverage of the nsa an outgrowth of white privilege? our guests will debate whether or not liberals are favoring certain rights for certain people over others. >>> first i want to share the three awesomest things on internet today. beginning with video that is awesome in the sense that it is just absolutely crazy. bayou corn, louisiana, is the site of what "mother jones" calls the biggest ongoing industrial disasters in the united states you haven't heard of. state is suing a mining company called texas brine for allegedly causing a massive underground sinkhole surely, slowly swallowing the town. it is growing. the entire town of 340 people have been forced to evacuate. unfortunately, the trees surrounding the sinkhole don't have that option. check that out. the assumption parish emergency response team released this video wednesday. an entire grove of trees getting sucked down, 750 feet deep. notice they don't fall over. they get sucked down into the massive hole below. amazing and terrifying. the secon
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 617 (some duplicates have been removed)